The Effect of Coffee on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Are you struggling with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia?

Do you like coffee? Find out what coffee and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia has in common.

Here is the latest result from clinical research on the effect of coffee on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), popularly known as prostate enlargement.

As man ages, the symptoms of an enlarged prostate (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) may become more evident by increasing urination urgency, and frequency as well, notably at night.

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia can cause a man to wake up to urinate as much as 6 times a night. The urgency in urinate is caused by the obstruction of the urethra, which is the canal through which the urine flows out of the bladder. The prostate is a nut-size gland located just below the bladder and around the urethra. As the prostate enlarges, squeezes the urethra, reducing the urine flow and also creating the sensation that the bladder is full when it may not. The symptoms and discomfort increases with age as the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia becomes more a serious condition if left untreated.

The treatments available for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia go from medicines to relax the prostate, which may relieve the symptoms, to surgery. The choice of treatment depends on how bad are the symptoms of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, and other health conditions. In the mean time, as you notice that the symptoms of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia are getting worst, you may try a nutritional supplement for prostate. Most prostate supplements contain Saw Palmetto or Beta-sitosterol to relax the muscles that control the prostate gland, relieving the symptoms of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

There is no doubt that caffeine increases the urgency and frequency of urination. I can tell about one of our associates; a man, 55 years old, struggling with the symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Every night he wakes up every hour to urinate. It is not fun. He uses to drink a cup of coffee in the breakfast and other three or four cups of coffee during the day. He also likes soft drinks during lunch and dinner.

Here is what we know about coffee or drinks containing caffeine, which is the active ingredient in those drinks: Caffeine is highly diuretic. Caffeine acts on the blood cells, which in turn cause irritation of the prostate, increasing the sensation that the bladder is full, when it may not. Caffeine can cause the contraction of the tinny muscles that control the prostate, enhancing that bad sensation even further.

Other foods may also aggravate the symptoms of the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Like coffee, tea and chocolate contains high doses of caffeine and substances called theoxanthines, which are known as irritant to the prostate. The theoxanthines contained in the tea is much less, maybe about fifty percent of the theoxanthines contained in coffee. What these substances do is to stimulate the nervous system which in turn increases alertness, prompt muscle response and muscle contraction.

Any food containing caffeine can aggravate the symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. If you feel urgency to urinate, the frequency is increasing, or makes you feel great discomfort in the prostate; you should discontinue or reduce the intake of coffee, or any other drink containing caffeine.

The best practice is to reduce the intake of caffeine gradually; otherwise it may cause headaches or nausea. The nervous system needs some time to reset its conditioning. After cutting off or reducing drastically the caffeine intake, you may note significant improvements. However, the results may not be immediate. It may take a few days to note a difference. If you have to resume the intake of coffee, try to replace regular coffee with decaf, or perhaps you may reduce the quantity and the number of cups a day. One thing is sure; if you are struggling with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, you must choose and control you habits based on your health condition and physical comfort.



Source by Fred Mace

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